Frequently Asked Questions

Calculation methods

What is the Project Impact Assessment Method?

Under this method, energy savings can be calculated using an engineering assessment that typically includes measured data and industry recognised calculations. This method is commonly used where energy savings are small compared to the overall site consumption, or data for a site’s past energy consumption is unavailable.

This method can be used for residential, commercial or industrial sites and allows you to forward create certificates for 5 years with a discount, or to claim the energy savings on an annual basis.

The Project Impact Assessment Method is now closed to new applicants. However, new applicants are instead able to apply under the Project Impact Assessment with Measurement and Verification Method.

See Project Impact Assessment Method

What is the Project Impact Assessment with Measurement and Verification Method?

The Project Impact Assessment with Measurement and Verification Method was introduced in 2014. Under this method, energy savings are calculated using a ‘measurement and verification’ approach which is ‘signed off’ by a Measurement and Verification Professional. Energy savings certificates can be forward created for up to 10 years, or created annually.

See Project Impact Assessment with Measurement and Verification

What is the Metered Baseline Method?

Under this method, energy savings are calculated based on actual measured energy consumption before and after an activity has been implemented.

This method is typically used where energy savings result in a significant reduction in a site’s electricity consumption, and energy consumption data is available. This method has five sub-methods:

  • Baseline per unit of output

  • Baseline unaffected by output

  • Normalised baseline

  • National Australian Building Environment Rating System (NABERS)

  • Aggregated Metered Baseline.

See Metered Baseline Method

See NABERS Baseline

What is the Deemed Energy Savings Method?

The Deemed Energy Savings Method contains a number of sub-methods to calculate energy savings from a range of common energy saving activities. Under this method, energy savings are calculated using default factors and equations provided in Clause 9 of the ESS Rule. Sub-methods include:

  • Sale of New Appliances calculates energy savings from the sale of high efficiency household appliances such as fridges, freezers, clothes dryers and televisions
  • Commercial Lighting Energy Savings Formula determines the energy savings by calculating the difference between the consumption of the original and upgraded lighting equipment. This method uses default values and typically allows the forward creation of 10 years of energy savings
  • High Efficiency Motor Energy Savings Formula assigns default energy savings to certain upgrades of efficient motors and is based on the type of industry
  • Power Factor Correction Energy Savings Formula allows you to create certificates for improvements to a site's power factor using standard equations.
  • Removal of Old Appliances provides a way to calculate energy savings from the removal of old, or spare, refrigerators and freezers
  • Home Energy Efficiency Retrofits provides for a range of energy efficient solutions to improve overall energy efficiency of residential buildings. It includes activities such as replacing inefficient lighting, draught proofing external doors, windows and chimneys, replacing thermally inefficient windows and installing window glazing
  • Installation of High Efficiency Appliances is used to calculate energy savings from the installation of high efficiency commercial refrigeration and air conditioning systems.

See Methods for calculating energy savings

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